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Social Story: Mud Hives Training

Experimenting with new techniques, team UTMT recently learned to make mud hives and wall hives. These were explored as alternatives to the wooden beeboxes currently used to house our Apis cerana bees.
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Women trainees in Dhule learning to make a mud hive in a corner of a garden
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Comparison between a wooden beebox (LHS) and mud hive (RHS).

After completion, a mud hive will have the same eight wooden frames on which bees will begin building a honeycomb. With a shape and structure similar to a beebox, the mud hive closely replicates the internal environment bees are accustomed to living in. Using naturally available mud not only brings down raw material costs, it also helps maintain optimal temperature of the hive.
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Dhara Patel, Team Leader, Gujarat, gets her hands dirty
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A “wall hive” being made. (LHS) Work in progress and (RHS) the finished product. Basically it is a mud hive affixed into the wall of the village house. Through the wooden “door” on the front side, beekeepers open the structure to check on their bees.
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Technical Assistant Madhubhai Bhoya from Gujarat teaches women beekeepers construction of a mud hive.
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It’s time for a trainee to practically apply Madhubhai’s teaching